terraform-provider-acme

command module
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Published: Jul 19, 2017 License: Apache-2.0 Imports: 2 Imported by: 0

README

Terraform ACME Provider

This repository contains a plugin form of the ACME provider that was proposed and submitted in Terraform PR #7058.

The Automated Certificate Management Environment (ACME) provider is used to interact with an ACME Certificate Authority, such as Let's Encrypt (https://letsencrypt.org/). This provider can be used to both manage registrations and certificates.

About ACME

The Automated Certificate Management Environment (ACME) is an emerging standard for the automation of a domain-validated certificate authority. Clients set up registrations using a private key and contact information, obtain authorizations for domains using a variety of challenges such as HTTP, HTTPS (TLS), and DNS, with which they can request certificates. No part of this process requires user interaction, a traditional blocker in obtaining a domain validated certificate.

Currently the major ACME CA is Let's Encrypt (https://letsencrypt.org/), but the ACME support in Terraform can be configured to use any ACME CA, including an internal one that is set up using Boulder.

You can read the ACME specification here. Note that the specification is currently still in draft, and some features in the specification may not be fully implemented in ACME CAs like Let's Encrypt or Boulder, and subsequently, Terraform.

Installing

See the Plugin Basics page of the Terraform docs to see how to plunk this into your config. Check the releases page of this repo to get releases for Linux, OS X, and Windows.

Usage

The following section details the use of the provider and its two resources: acme_registration and acme_certificate.

These docs are derived from the middleman templates that were created for the old PR itself, and can be found in their original form here.

Note on Examples

NOTE: Note that usage examples use the Let's Encrypt staging environment. If you are using Let's Encrypt, make sure you change the URL to the correct endpoint (currently https://acme-v01.api.letsencrypt.org/directory).

Example Usage

The below example is an end-to-end demonstration of the setup of a basic certificate, with a little help from the tls_private_key resource:

# Create the private key for the registration (not the certificate)
resource "tls_private_key" "private_key" {
  algorithm = "RSA"
}

# Set up a registration using a private key from tls_private_key
resource "acme_registration" "reg" {
  server_url      = "https://acme-staging.api.letsencrypt.org/directory"
  account_key_pem = "${tls_private_key.private_key.private_key_pem}"
  email_address   = "nobody@example.com"
}

# Create a certificate
resource "acme_certificate" "certificate" {
  server_url                = "https://acme-staging.api.letsencrypt.org/directory"
  account_key_pem           = "${tls_private_key.private_key.private_key_pem}"
  common_name               = "www.example.com"
  subject_alternative_names = ["www2.example.com"]

  dns_challenge {
    provider = "route53"
  }

  registration_url = "${acme_registration.reg.id}"
}
Registration Credentials

Note that in the above usage example, server_url and account_key_pem are required in both resources, and are not configured in a provider block. This allows Terraform the freedom to set up a registration from scratch, with nothing needing to be done out-of-band - as seen in the example above, the account_key_pem is derived from a tls_private_key resource.

This also means that the two resources can be de-coupled from each other - there is no need for acme_registration or acme_certificate to appear in the same Terraform configuration. One configuration can set up the registration, with another setting up the certificate, using the registration from the previous configuration, or one supplied out-of-band.

The acme_registration Resource

Use this resource to create and manage an ACME registration.

NOTE: While the ACME draft does contain provisions for deactivating registrations, implementation is still in development, so if this resource in Terraform is destroyed, the registration is not completely deleted.

Example

The following creates an ACME registration off of a private key generated with the tls_private_key resource.

# Create the private key for the registration (not the certificate)
resource "tls_private_key" "private_key" {
  algorithm = "RSA"
}

# Set up a registration using a private key from tls_private_key
resource "acme_registration" "reg" {
  server_url      = "https://acme-staging.api.letsencrypt.org/directory"
  account_key_pem = "${tls_private_key.private_key.private_key_pem}"
  email_address   = "nobody@example.com"
}
Argument Reference

The resource takes the following arguments:

  • server_url (Required) - The URL of the ACME directory endpoint.
  • account_key_pem (Required) - The private key used to sign requests. This is the private key that will be registered to the account.
  • email_address (Required) - The email address that will be attached as a contact to the registration.
Attribute Reference

The following attributes are exported:

  • id - The full URL of the registration. Same as registration_url.
  • registration_body: The raw body of the registration response, in JSON format.
  • registration_url: The full URL of the registration. Same as id.
  • registration_new_authz_url: The full URL to the endpoint used to create new authorizations.
  • registration_tos_url: The full URL to the CA's terms of service.
The acme_certificate Resource

Use this resource to create and manage an ACME TLS certificate.

NOTE: Some current ACME CA implementations like Boulder strip most of the organization information out of a certificate request's subject, so you may wish to confirm with the CA what behaviour to expect when using the certificate_request_pem argument with this resource.

Example
Full example with common_name and subject_alternative_names and DNS validation
# Create the private key for the registration (not the certificate)
resource "tls_private_key" "private_key" {
  algorithm = "RSA"
}

# Set up a registration using a private key from tls_private_key
resource "acme_registration" "reg" {
  server_url      = "https://acme-staging.api.letsencrypt.org/directory"
  account_key_pem = "${tls_private_key.private_key.private_key_pem}"
  email_address   = "nobody@example.com"
}

# Create a certificate
resource "acme_certificate" "certificate" {
  server_url                = "https://acme-staging.api.letsencrypt.org/directory"
  account_key_pem           = "${tls_private_key.private_key.private_key_pem}"
  common_name               = "www.example.com"
  subject_alternative_names = ["www2.example.com"]

  dns_challenge {
    provider = "route53"
  }

  registration_url = "${acme_registration.reg.id}"
}
Above example with OCSP Stapling Required
# Create the private key for the registration (not the certificate)
resource "tls_private_key" "private_key" {
  algorithm = "RSA"
}

# Set up a registration using a private key from tls_private_key
resource "acme_registration" "reg" {
  server_url      = "https://acme-staging.api.letsencrypt.org/directory"
  account_key_pem = "${tls_private_key.private_key.private_key_pem}"
  email_address   = "nobody@example.com"
}

# Create a certificate.
# This certificate must include an OCSP Staple in the TLS handshake for the
# connection to succeed.
resource "acme_certificate" "certificate" {
  server_url                = "https://acme-staging.api.letsencrypt.org/directory"
  account_key_pem           = "${tls_private_key.private_key.private_key_pem}"
  common_name               = "www.example.com"
  subject_alternative_names = ["www2.example.com"]
  must_staple               = true

  dns_challenge {
    provider = "route53"
  }

  registration_url = "${acme_registration.reg.id}"
}
Above example with HTTP/TLS validation
# Create the private key for the registration (not the certificate)
resource "tls_private_key" "private_key" {
  algorithm = "RSA"
}

# Set up a registration using a private key from tls_private_key
resource "acme_registration" "reg" {
  server_url      = "https://acme-staging.api.letsencrypt.org/directory"
  account_key_pem = "${tls_private_key.private_key.private_key_pem}"
  email_address   = "nobody@example.com"
}

# Create a certificate
resource "acme_certificate" "certificate" {
  server_url                = "https://acme-staging.api.letsencrypt.org/directory"
  account_key_pem           = "${tls_private_key.private_key.private_key_pem}"
  common_name               = "www.example.com"
  subject_alternative_names = ["www2.example.com"]

  http_challenge_port = 8080
  tls_challenge_port 8443 

  registration_url = "${acme_registration.reg.id}"
}
Full example with certificate_request_pem and DNS validation
resource "tls_private_key" "reg_private_key" {
  algorithm = "RSA"
}

resource "acme_registration" "reg" {
  server_url      = "https://acme-staging.api.letsencrypt.org/directory"
  account_key_pem = "${tls_private_key.reg_private_key.private_key_pem}"
  email_address   = "nobody@example.com"
}

resource "tls_private_key" "cert_private_key" {
  algorithm = "RSA"
}

resource "tls_cert_request" "req" {
  key_algorithm   = "RSA"
  private_key_pem = "${tls_private_key.cert_private_key.private_key_pem}"
  dns_names       = ["www.example.com", "www2.example.com"]

  subject {
    common_name  = "www.example.com"
  }
}

resource "acme_certificate" "certificate" {
  server_url       = "https://acme-staging.api.letsencrypt.org/directory"
  account_key_pem  = "${tls_private_key.reg_private_key.private_key_pem}"
  certificate_request_pem = "${tls_cert_request.req.cert_request_pem}"

  dns_challenge {
    provider = "route53"
  }

  registration_url = "${acme_registration.reg.id}"
}
Argument Reference

The resource takes the following arguments:

  • server_url (Required) - The URL of the ACME directory endpoint.
  • account_key_pem (Required) - The private key used to sign requests. This will be the private key that will be registered to the account.
  • registration_url (Required) - The URL that will be used to fetch the registration's link to perform authorizations.
  • common_name - The certificate's common name, the primary domain that the certificate will be recognized for. Required when not specifying a CSR.
  • subject_alternative_names - The certificate's subject alternative names, domains that this certificate will also be recognized for. Only valid when not specifying a CSR.
  • key_type - The key type for the certificate's private key. Can be one of: P256 and P384 (for ECDSA keys of respective length) or 2048, 4096, and 8192 (for RSA keys of respective length). Required when not specifying a CSR. The default is 2048 (RSA key of 2048 bits).
  • certificate_request_pem - A pre-created certificate request, such as one from tls_cert_request, or one from an external source, in PEM format. Either this, or common_name, key_type, and optionally subject_alternative_names needs to be specified.
  • min_days_remaining (Optional) - The minimum amount of days remaining before the certificate expires before a renewal is attempted. The default is 7. A value of less than 0 means that the certificate will never be renewed.
  • dns_challenge (Optional) - Select a DNS challenge to use in fulfilling the request. If this is used, HTTP and TLS challenges are disabled.
  • http_challenge_port (Optional) The port to use in the HTTP challenge. Defaults to 80.
  • tls_challenge_port (Optional) The port to use in the TLS challenge. Defaults to 443.
  • must_staple (Optional) Enables the OCSP Stapling Required TLS Security Policy extension. Certificates with this extension must include a valid OCSP Staple in the TLS handshake for the connection to succeed. Defaults to false. Note that this option has no effect when using an external CSR - it must be enabled in the CSR itself.
Using DNS challenges

ACME and ACME CAs such as Let's Encrypt may support DNS challenges, which allows operators to respond to authorization challenges by provisioning a TXT record on a specific domain.

Terraform, making use of lego, responds to DNS challenges automatically by utilizing one of lego's supported DNS challenge providers. Most providers take credentials as environment variables, but if you would rather use configuration for this purpose, you can through specifying config blocks within a dns_challenge block, along with the provider parameter.

Example with Route 53 (AWS):

# Configure the AWS Provider
provider "aws" {
  access_key = "${var.aws_access_key}"
  secret_key = "${var.aws_secret_key}"
  region = "us-east-1"
}

# Create a certificate
resource "acme_certificate" "certificate" {
  ...

  dns_challenge {
    provider = "route53"
    config {
      AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID     = "${var.aws_access_key}"
      AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY = "${var.aws_secret_key}"
      AWS_DEFAULT_REGION    = "us-east-1"
    }
  }

  ...
}

Using HTTP and TLS challenges

HTTP challenges and TLS challenges work via provisioning a response message at a specific URL within a well known URI namespace on the hosts being requested within a certificate.

This presents a unique challenge to Terraform, as normally, Terraform is more than likely not being run from a live webserver. It is, however, possible to proxy these requests to the host running Terraform. In order to do this, perform the following:

  • Set your http_challenge_port or tls_challenge_port to non-standard ports, or leave them if you can assign the Terraform binary the cap_net_bind_service=+ep - (Linux hosts only). Example configuration here.
  • Proxy the following to the host running Terraform, on the respective ports:
  • All requests on port 80 under the /.well-known/acme-challenge/ URI namespace for HTTP challenges, or:
  • All TLS requests on port 443 for TLS challenges.
Attribute Reference

The following attributes are exported:

  • id - The full URL of the certificate. Same as certificate_url.
  • certificate_domain - The common name of the certificate.
  • certificate_url - The URL for the certificate. Same as id.
  • account_ref - The URI of the registration account for this certificate. should be the same as registration_url.
  • private_key_pem - The certificate's private key, in PEM format, if the certificate was generated from scratch and not with certificate_request_pem. If certificate_request_pem was used, this will be blank.
  • certificate_pem - The certificate in PEM format.
  • issuer_pem - The intermediate certificate of the issuer.

License

Copyright 2016 PayByPhone Technologies, Inc.

Licensed under the Apache License, Version 2.0 (the "License");
you may not use this file except in compliance with the License.
You may obtain a copy of the License at

    http://www.apache.org/licenses/LICENSE-2.0

Unless required by applicable law or agreed to in writing, software
distributed under the License is distributed on an "AS IS" BASIS,
WITHOUT WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS OF ANY KIND, either express or implied.
See the License for the specific language governing permissions and
limitations under the License.

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