metadata

package
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Published: Jul 22, 2024 License: BSD-3-Clause Imports: 9 Imported by: 0

Documentation

Overview

The metadata package defines types and functions for working with package metadata, which describes Go packages and their relationships.

Package metadata is loaded by gopls using go/packages, and the Package type is itself a projection and translation of data from go/packages.Package.

Packages are assembled into an immutable Graph

Index

Constants

This section is empty.

Variables

This section is empty.

Functions

func IsCommandLineArguments

func IsCommandLineArguments(id PackageID) bool

IsCommandLineArguments reports whether a given value denotes "command-line-arguments" package, which is a package with an unknown ID created by the go command. It can have a test variant, which is why callers should not check that a value equals "command-line-arguments" directly.

func IsValidImport

func IsValidImport(from, to PackagePath, goList bool) bool

IsValidImport returns whether from may import to.

func RemoveIntermediateTestVariants

func RemoveIntermediateTestVariants(pmetas *[]*Package)

RemoveIntermediateTestVariants removes intermediate test variants, modifying the array. We use a pointer to a slice make it impossible to forget to use the result.

func SortPostOrder

func SortPostOrder(meta Source, ids []PackageID)

SortPostOrder sorts the IDs so that if x depends on y, then y appears before x.

Types

type Graph

type Graph struct {
	// Packages maps package IDs to their associated Packages.
	Packages map[PackageID]*Package

	// ImportedBy maps package IDs to the list of packages that import them.
	ImportedBy map[PackageID][]PackageID

	// IDs maps file URIs to package IDs, sorted by (!valid, cli, packageID).
	// A single file may belong to multiple packages due to tests packages.
	//
	// Invariant: all IDs present in the IDs map exist in the metadata map.
	IDs map[protocol.DocumentURI][]PackageID
}

A Graph is an immutable and transitively closed graph of Package data.

func (*Graph) ReverseReflexiveTransitiveClosure

func (g *Graph) ReverseReflexiveTransitiveClosure(ids ...PackageID) map[PackageID]*Package

ReverseReflexiveTransitiveClosure returns a new mapping containing the metadata for the specified packages along with any package that transitively imports one of them, keyed by ID, including all the initial packages.

func (*Graph) Update

func (g *Graph) Update(updates map[PackageID]*Package) *Graph

Update creates a new Graph containing the result of applying the given updates to the receiver, though the receiver is not itself mutated. As a special case, if updates is empty, Update just returns the receiver.

A nil map value is used to indicate a deletion.

type ImportPath

type ImportPath string // path that appears in an import declaration (e.g. "example.com/foo")

Declare explicit types for package paths, names, and IDs to ensure that we never use an ID where a path belongs, and vice versa. If we confused these, it would result in confusing errors because package IDs often look like package paths.

func UnquoteImportPath

func UnquoteImportPath(spec *ast.ImportSpec) ImportPath

UnquoteImportPath returns the unquoted import path of s, or "" if the path is not properly quoted.

type Package

type Package struct {
	ID      PackageID
	PkgPath PackagePath
	Name    PackageName

	// these three fields are as defined by go/packages.Package
	GoFiles         []protocol.DocumentURI
	CompiledGoFiles []protocol.DocumentURI
	IgnoredFiles    []protocol.DocumentURI

	ForTest       PackagePath // q in a "p [q.test]" package, else ""
	TypesSizes    types.Sizes
	Errors        []packages.Error          // must be set for packages in import cycles
	DepsByImpPath map[ImportPath]PackageID  // may contain dups; empty ID => missing
	DepsByPkgPath map[PackagePath]PackageID // values are unique and non-empty
	Module        *packages.Module
	DepsErrors    []*packagesinternal.PackageError
	LoadDir       string // directory from which go/packages was run
	Standalone    bool   // package synthesized for a standalone file (e.g. ignore-tagged)
}

Package represents package metadata retrieved from go/packages. The DepsBy{Imp,Pkg}Path maps do not contain self-import edges.

An ad-hoc package (without go.mod or GOPATH) has its ID, PkgPath, and LoadDir equal to the absolute path of its directory.

func (*Package) IsIntermediateTestVariant

func (mp *Package) IsIntermediateTestVariant() bool

IsIntermediateTestVariant reports whether the given package is an intermediate test variant (ITV), e.g. "net/http net/url.test".

An ITV has identical syntax to the regular variant, but different import metadata (DepsBy{Imp,Pkg}Path).

Such test variants arise when an x_test package (in this case net/url_test) imports a package (in this case net/http) that itself imports the non-x_test package (in this case net/url).

This is done so that the forward transitive closure of net/url_test has only one package for the "net/url" import. The ITV exists to hold the test variant import:

net/url_test net/url.test

| "net/http" -> net/http [net/url.test]
| "net/url" -> net/url [net/url.test]
| ...

net/http net/url.test

| "net/url" -> net/url [net/url.test]
| ...

This restriction propagates throughout the import graph of net/http: for every package imported by net/http that imports net/url, there must be an intermediate test variant that instead imports "net/url net/url.test".

As one can see from the example of net/url and net/http, intermediate test variants can result in many additional packages that are essentially (but not quite) identical. For this reason, we filter these variants wherever possible.

Why we mostly ignore intermediate test variants

In projects with complicated tests, there may be a very large number of ITVs--asymptotically more than the number of ordinary variants. Since they have identical syntax, it is fine in most cases to ignore them since the results of analyzing the ordinary variant suffice. However, this is not entirely sound.

Consider this package:

// p/p.go -- in all variants of p
package p
type T struct { io.Closer }

// p/p_test.go -- in test variant of p
package p
func (T) Close() error { ... }

The ordinary variant "p" defines T with a Close method promoted from io.Closer. But its test variant "p [p.test]" defines a type T with a Close method from p_test.go.

Now consider a package q that imports p, perhaps indirectly. Within it, T.Close will resolve to the first Close method:

// q/q.go -- in all variants of q
package q
import "p"
var _ = new(p.T).Close

Let's assume p also contains this file defining an external test (xtest):

// p/p_x_test.go -- external test of p
package p_test
import ( "q"; "testing" )
func Test(t *testing.T) { ... }

Note that q imports p, but p's xtest imports q. Now, in "q [p.test]", the intermediate test variant of q built for p's external test, T.Close resolves not to the io.Closer.Close interface method, but to the concrete method of T.Close declared in p_test.go.

If we now request all references to the T.Close declaration in p_test.go, the result should include the reference from q's ITV. (It's not just methods that can be affected; fields can too, though it requires bizarre code to achieve.)

As a matter of policy, gopls mostly ignores this subtlety, because to account for it would require that we type-check every intermediate test variant of p, of which there could be many. Good code doesn't rely on such trickery.

Most callers of MetadataForFile call RemoveIntermediateTestVariants to discard them before requesting type checking, or the products of type-checking such as the cross-reference index or method set index.

MetadataForFile doesn't do this filtering itself because in some cases we need to make a reverse dependency query on the metadata graph, and it's important to include the rdeps of ITVs in that query. But the filtering of ITVs should be applied after that step, before type checking.

In general, we should never type check an ITV.

func (*Package) String

func (mp *Package) String() string

type PackageID

type PackageID string // go list's unique identifier for a package (e.g. "vendor/example.com/foo [vendor/example.com/bar.test]")

Declare explicit types for package paths, names, and IDs to ensure that we never use an ID where a path belongs, and vice versa. If we confused these, it would result in confusing errors because package IDs often look like package paths.

type PackageName

type PackageName string // identifier in 'package' declaration (e.g. "foo")

Declare explicit types for package paths, names, and IDs to ensure that we never use an ID where a path belongs, and vice versa. If we confused these, it would result in confusing errors because package IDs often look like package paths.

type PackagePath

type PackagePath string // name used to prefix linker symbols (e.g. "vendor/example.com/foo")

Declare explicit types for package paths, names, and IDs to ensure that we never use an ID where a path belongs, and vice versa. If we confused these, it would result in confusing errors because package IDs often look like package paths.

type Source

type Source interface {
	// Metadata returns the [Package] for the given package ID, or nil if it does
	// not exist.
	// TODO(rfindley): consider returning (*Metadata, bool)
	// TODO(rfindley): consider renaming this method.
	Metadata(PackageID) *Package
}

A Source maps package IDs to metadata for the packages.

TODO(rfindley): replace this with a concrete metadata graph, once it is exposed from the snapshot.

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