filter

package module
Version: v0.0.0-...-dcb4225 Latest Latest
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Published: Aug 31, 2021 License: BSD-3-Clause Imports: 1 Imported by: 8

README

I wanted to see how hard it was to implement this sort of thing in Go, with as nice an API as I could manage. It wasn't hard.

Having written it a couple of years ago, I haven't had occasion to use it once. Instead, I just use "for" loops.

You shouldn't use it either.

Documentation

Overview

Package filter contains utility functions for filtering slices through the distributed application of a filter function.

The package is an experiment to see how easy it is to write such things in Go. It is easy, but for loops are just as easy and more efficient.

You should not use this package.

Index

Constants

This section is empty.

Variables

This section is empty.

Functions

func Apply

func Apply(slice, function interface{}) interface{}

Apply takes a slice of type []T and a function of type func(T) T. (If the input conditions are not satisfied, Apply panics.) It returns a newly allocated slice where each element is the result of calling the function on successive elements of the slice.

func ApplyInPlace

func ApplyInPlace(slice, function interface{})

ApplyInPlace is like Apply, but overwrites the slice rather than returning a newly allocated slice.

func Choose

func Choose(slice, function interface{}) interface{}

Choose takes a slice of type []T and a function of type func(T) bool. (If the input conditions are not satisfied, Choose panics.) It returns a newly allocated slice containing only those elements of the input slice that satisfy the function.

func ChooseInPlace

func ChooseInPlace(pointerToSlice, function interface{})

ChooseInPlace is like Choose, but overwrites the slice rather than returning a newly allocated slice. Since ChooseInPlace must modify the header of the slice to set the new length, it takes as argument a pointer to a slice rather than a slice.

func Drop

func Drop(slice, function interface{}) interface{}

Drop takes a slice of type []T and a function of type func(T) bool. (If the input conditions are not satisfied, Drop panics.) It returns a newly allocated slice containing only those elements of the input slice that do not satisfy the function, that is, it removes elements that satisfy the function.

func DropInPlace

func DropInPlace(pointerToSlice, function interface{})

DropInPlace is like Drop, but overwrites the slice rather than returning a newly allocated slice. Since DropInPlace must modify the header of the slice to set the new length, it takes as argument a pointer to a slice rather than a slice.

func Reduce

func Reduce(slice, pairFunction, zero interface{}) interface{}

Reduce computes the reduction of the pair function across the elements of the slice. (If the types of the slice and function do not correspond, Reduce panics.) For instance, if the slice contains successive integers starting at 1 and the function is multiply, the result will be the factorial function. If the slice is empty, Reduce returns zero; if it has only one element, it returns that element. The return value must be type-asserted by the caller back to the element type of the slice. Example:

func multiply(a, b int) int { return a*b }
a := []int{1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10}
factorial := Reduce(a, multiply, 1).(int)

Types

This section is empty.

Source Files

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