setup-new-aws-user

module
Version: v0.5.2 Latest Latest
Warning

This package is not in the latest version of its module.

Go to latest
Published: Jul 21, 2020 License: BSD-3-Clause

README

setup-new-aws-user

This tool is used to grant programmatic access to AWS account(s) using aws-vault. It works by taking a temporary set of AWS access keys for a new IAM user. It then generates a virtual MFA device and permanent set of access keys. Finally, it removes the temporary access keys.

Installation

For Mac OS Homebrew:

brew tap trussworks/tap
brew install setup-new-aws-user
Dependencies

This tool requires aws-vault be installed. You can install via homebrew:

brew cask install aws-vault

Usage

This tool has several subcommands. Read each section to learn more.

setup-new-aws-user setup

Before running this tool, you will need to following pieces of information

  • IAM user name - This is your IAM username. Use the flag --iam-user with this value.
  • IAM role name - This is the IAM Role with permissions allowing access to AWS APIs and services. This is usually something like admin or engineer. Use the flag --iam-role with this value.
  • AWS Profiles and Account IDs - This is the set of aws profile names you wish to add along with the corresponding AWS account ID. They are referenced as <AWS_PROFILE>:<AWS_ACCOUNT_ID>. Use the flag name --aws-profile-account with each set you wish to add.
  • Temporary AWS access keys - These should be given to you by an administrator of the AWS account you are trying to access. The tool will prompt you for the access key id and secret access key.
  1. Run the setup-new-user script

    setup-new-aws-user setup \
      --iam-user <USER> \
      --iam-role <ROLE> \
      --aws-profile-account <AWS_PROFILE1>:<AWS_ACCOUNT_ID1> \
      --aws-profile-account <AWS_PROFILE2>:<AWS_ACCOUNT_ID2>
    
  2. Enter the access keys generated when prompted.

  3. The script will open a window with a QR code, which you will use to configure a temporary one time password (TOTP).

  4. You'll then need to create a new entry in your 1Password account configure it with a TOTP field.

  5. Use 1Password to scan the QR code and hit save. New TOTP tokens should generate every 30 seconds.

  6. From here the tool will prompt you for 3 unique TOTP tokens. NOTE Take care not to use the same token more than once, as this will cause the process to fail.

  7. Once the tool has completed, you should be able to access the AWS account. You can run the following command filling in the AWS_PROFILE value

    aws-vault exec $AWS_PROFILE -- aws sts get-session
    
How setup modifies your ~/.aws/config

While your AWS access keys are stored in a password protected keychain managed by aws-vault, the configuration for how you should access AWS accounts lives in ~/.aws/config. The setup-new-aws-user setup tool creates new profiles in ~/.aws/config. The first is the base profile containing your long lived AWS Access Keys and is tied to your IAM user and MFA device. Since these keys are long lived, you should be rotating them regularly with aws-vault rotate. The second profile is the IAM role granting you elevated access to the AWS account. Typically these IAM roles are named admin or engineer and only uses temporary credentials leveraging AWS's Security Token Service (STS). Below is an example config generated from this tool. Additional profiles will be similarly added and reference the base profile.

[profile corp-id-base]
mfa_serial=arn:aws:iam::123456789012:mfa/alice
region=us-west-2
output=json

[profile corp-id]
source_profile=corp-id-base
mfa_serial=arn:aws:iam::123456789012:mfa/alice
role_arn=arn:aws:iam::123456789012:role/admin
region=us-west-2
output=json
MFA Management

This tool will help create and enable a virtual MFA device. The interface for the MFA device is a QR code which will be shown to the user during setup. This QR code can be used with a password manager to provide the One Time Passwords (OTP) values asked for in the script.

In the case where the user has a virtual MFA device already set up they can choose not to provision a new one. This is done by issuing the --no-mfa flag on the command line in conjunction with the regular command from above.

setup-new-aws-user add-profile

Before running this tool, you will need to following pieces of information

  • IAM role name - This is the IAM Role with permissions allowing access to AWS APIs and services. This is usually something like admin or engineer. Use the flag --iam-role with this value.
  • AWS profile - This is the name of the profile in your ~/.aws/config profile that you wish to use as the basis for adding new profiles. The source_profile and mfa_serial is pulled from this profile. Use the flag name --aws-profile with this value.
  • AWS Profiles and Account IDs - This is the set of aws profile names you wish to add along with the corresponding AWS account ID. They are referenced as <AWS_PROFILE>:<AWS_ACCOUNT_ID>. Use the flag name --aws-profile-account with each set you wish to add.
  1. Run the setup-new-user script -

    setup-new-aws-user add-profile \
      --aws-profile <AWS_PROFILE> \
      --iam-role <IAM_ROLE> \
      --aws-profile-account <AWS_PROFILE1>:<AWS_ACCOUNT_ID1> \
      --aws-profile-account <AWS_PROFILE2>:<AWS_ACCOUNT_ID2>
    
  2. Once the tool has completed, you should be able to access the AWS account. You can run the following command filling in the AWS_PROFILE value

    aws-vault exec $AWS_PROFILE -- aws sts get-session
    
How add-profile modifies your ~/.aws/config

While your AWS access keys are stored in a password protected keychain managed by aws-vault, the configuration for how you should access AWS accounts lives in ~/.aws/config. The setup-new-aws-user add-profile tool creates new profiles in ~/.aws/config. New profiles reference the source_profile and mfa_serial of the --aws-profile used in the command and uses the IAM role granting you elevated access to the AWS account. Typically these IAM roles are named admin or engineer and only uses temporary credentials leveraging AWS's Security Token Service (STS). Below is an example config generated from this tool. Additional profiles will be similarly added and reference the base profile.

[profile corp-new]
source_profile=corp-id-base
mfa_serial=arn:aws:iam::123456789012:mfa/alice
role_arn=arn:aws:iam::123456789012:role/engineer
region=us-west-2
output=json

NOTE: If you supply an aws-profile name that already exists in '~/.aws/config` this script will rewrite that profile in your config.

setup-new-aws-user version

To get the version of the tool run:

setup-new-aws-user version

In development mode you may see the word development returned. Otherwise you should see the version of the tool as it was built by the release pipeline.

Development setup

  1. First, install these packages: brew install pre-commit direnv go
  2. Next, clone the project repository.
  3. Finally, run these commands inside the local repo: direnv allow
  4. The .envrc will be loaded if direnv is installed.
Testing
Unit Tests

Run pre-commit and Go tests

pre-commit run -a
make test
Integration / End 2 End Testing

For testing, create a test IAM user so as not to interfere with your primary user credentials and AWS config settings. The test user will need the enforce-mfa policy and permission to assume whichever role being assigned. Generate an access key for the user, and use those when running the script. For the AWS profile, do not use an existing profile name. You can use a dummy name for the profile; it doesn't need to match the account alias. However, you must use the real AWS account ID.

Example:

go run ./cmd setup --iam-role engineer --iam-user testuser --aws-profile-account test-profile-name:123456789012

After running the script, try a command to ensure the new profile works as expected:

Example (include AWS_VAULT_KEYCHAIN_NAME if the environment variable is not set):

AWS_VAULT_KEYCHAIN_NAME=login aws-vault exec test-profile-name -- aws sts get-caller-identity
Troubleshooting
User partially creates MFA device

The user might find themselves in an odd situation where the virtual MFA device was created but not assigned to the user. This will prevent the user from coming back to the setup script and completing it. Here are steps to resolve if the vMFA was created with no assigned user:

aws iam list-virtual-mfa-devices
# Find device with serial format of `arn:aws:iam::<AWS_ACCOUNT_ID>:mfa/<IAM_USERNAME>`
# It may be listed without a User associated with it.
SERIAL=arn:aws:iam::<AWS_ACCOUNT_ID>:mfa/<IAM_USERNAME>
aws iam delete-virtual-mfa-device --serial-number "$SERIAL"

If the device was registered to a user it may need to be deactivated first, in which case its easier to find the SERIAL programatically:

export USERNAME=somebody
SERIAL=$(aws iam list-mfa-devices --user-name "${USERNAME}" | jq -r ".MFADevices[].SerialNumber")
aws iam deactivate-mfa-device --user-name "${USERNAME}" --serial-number "${SERIAL}"
aws iam delete-virtual-mfa-device --serial-number "$SERIAL"

Now the device should be completely removed. Have them re-run the script.

Directories

Path Synopsis

Jump to

Keyboard shortcuts

? : This menu
/ : Search site
f or F : Jump to
y or Y : Canonical URL